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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
the internet in the first place. back then, the u.s. was in the catbird seat, poised to lead the world down this astonishing new superhighway of information and innovation. now many other countries offer their citizens faster and cheaper access than we do. the faster high-speed access comes through fiber optic lines that transmit data in bursts of laser light, but many of us are still hooked up to broadband connections that squeeze digital information through copper wire. we're stuck with this old-fashioned technology because, as susan crawford explains, our government has allowed a few giant conglomerates to rig the rules, raise prices, and stifle competition. just like standard oil in the first gilded age a century ago. in those days, it was muckrakers like ida tarbell and lincoln steffens rattling the cages and calling for fair play. today it's independent thinkers like susan crawford. the big telecom industry wishes she would go away, but she's got a lot of people on her side. in fact, if you go to the white house citizen's petition site, you'll see how fans of "captive audience" are ca
, measure what that means for us. what does that mean? >> i think the good news here is that the u.s. economy is actually growing at probably about a 2% rate. so if the full sequester goes in and stays in place for the full year between now and the end of the year, then it's essentially what mr. bernanke is saying growth will be 1.5% instead of 2%. i doubt very much that's the way it's going to pan out. eventually some kind of compromise will be worked out. but again the good news is that the u.s. consumers, u.s. businesses, are beginning to spend, are beginning to hire in the case of businesses, and that momentum seems to actually be picking up a little bit. so even in the worst case scenario we're not talking a recession. we're talking slower growth which isn't good... >> ifill: not good at a time when you're recovering. so when people look at this debate that's going on now, how do we look at it? do we look at it long-term, short term? do we look at the reality or the possibility? what is the greatest, most damaging part of this? >> well, i think the damaging part of it is, you kn
or relink wrbd the reigns then had quite a long struggle. i think part of the whole reason that the u.s., i'm sort of an amateur student of the u.s. automobile industry. i think part of the reason that it ran into trouble was way before the 1970s. it was because the founders of those companies had relinquished the reign reins to businesspeople, not product people. >> rose: buzz as soon as you say that, i would make this observation. look what happened to ford. >> yes. >> rose: c.e.o. of ford. >> yes, yeah. >> rose: -- grew newspaper the car business, was not an engineer but was a superb manager. and great sensibility for product. and i think-- . >> rose: yeah. >> and i think that's the element that gets missed a lot of the time. in these management turnovers. and particularly for technology company. you absolutely have to have as the guiding force of an abiding enduring technology company, a person or people at the helm who have products in their dna. >> rose: yeah. >> who love, who are crazed by the idea of making that thing better. >> better. >> the best. or making it better or the best o
days $85 billion in aubling spending cuts will begin to ripple through the u.s. economy. the impact will be felt across society from education, to medical care to national defense. the sequester deadline imposed in the summer of 2011 was intended to sharpern the government's focus on the fat debt. president obama pushed for a last minute compromise to lessen the economic damage. >> these impacts will not all be felt on day one. but rest assured the uncertainty is already having an effect. companies are preparing layoff notices. families are preparing to cut back on expenses. and the longer these cuts are in place, the bigger the impact will become. >> these cut does not have to happen. congress can turn them off any time with just a little bit of compromise. >> rose: steve rattner has had a distinguished career in journalism, business and government, instrumental in turning around the automobile industry, and currently chairman of advisors and the economic analyst for msnbc's morning joses and a regular contributer to the "new york times" and financial times. so i'm pleased to have
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)